WikiUnits

Convert Pressure

Pressure
Dimension ML-2
Common Symbol(s) p, P
SI Unit(s) Pascal
Imperial/US Unit(s) psi
Other Unit(s) bar, mH2O, torr
Unit conversions
1 Pascal in ... ... is equal to ...
Metric unit(s) 0.1020 kgf·m-2
British/Imperial 1.4504×10-4 psi
Other unit(s) 1×10-5 bar

I want to convert: using

Metric Conversion
Gigapascal [GPa]
Megapascal [MPa]
Kilopascal [kPa]
Pascal [Pa]
Kilogram-force per square centimetre [kgf/cm²]
Kilogram-force per square metre [kgf/m²]
Millibar [mbar]
Bar
Avoirdupois (U.S.) Conversion
Kilopound per square inch [kpsi]
Pound per square inch [psi]
Pound per square foot [psf]
Water Conversion
Metre of water [mH2O]
Centimetre of water [cmH2O]
Millimetre of water [mmH2O]
Foot of water [ftH2O]
Inch of water [inH2O]
Atmosphere Conversion
Standard atmosphere [atm]
Technical atmosphere [at]
Mercury Conversion
Millimetre of mercury [mmHg]
Inch of mercury [inHg]
Torr

Pressure (symbol: p or P) is the force applied perpendicular to the surface of an object per unit area over which that force is distributed. Gauge pressure (also spelled gage pressure) is the pressure relative to the ambient pressure.

Various units are used to express pressure. Some of these derive from a unit of force divided by a unit of area; the SI unit of pressure, the Pascal (Pa), for example, is one newton per square metre; similarly, the pound-force per square inch (psi) is the traditional unit of pressure in the imperial and US customary systems.

Pressure may also be expressed in terms of standard atmospheric pressure; the atmosphere (atm) is equal to this pressure and the torr is defined as 1/760 of this. Manometric units such as the centimetre of water, millimetre of mercury, and inch of mercury are used to express pressures in terms of the height of column of a particular fluid in a manometer.

Pressure is a scalar quantity. It relates the vector surface element (a vector normal to the surface) with the normal force acting on it. The pressure is the scalar proportionality constant that relates two normal vectors.

This article uses material from the Wikipedia article "Pressure", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.