WikiUnits

Convert Energy

Energy
Dimension ML2T-2
SI Unit(s) J
Imperial/US Unit(s) BTU
Other Unit(s) cal
Unit conversions
1 J in ... ... is equal to ...
SI unit(s) 0.001 kJ
Imperial/US unit(s) 0.9478 BTU
Other unit(s) 0.2388 kcal

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Metric Conversion
MWh
kWh
Wh
MJ
kJ
J
Ws
erg
eV
British/Imperial Conversion
Quad
Therm
BTU
Foot-pound
Other Conversion
kcal
cal
Thermie

In physics, energy is the property that must be transferred to an object in order to perform work on – or to heat – the object, and can be converted in form, but not created or destroyed. The SI unit of energy is the joule, which is the energy transferred to an object by the mechanical work of moving it a distance of 1 metre against a force of 1 newton.

Common energy forms include the kinetic energy of a moving object, the potential energy stored by an object's position in a force field (gravitational, electric or magnetic), the elastic energy stored by stretching solid objects, the chemical energy released when a fuel burns, the radiant energy carried by light, and the thermal energy due to an object's temperature.

Mass and energy are closely related. Due to mass–energy equivalence, any object that has mass when stationary in a frame of reference (called rest mass) also has an equivalent amount of energy whose form is called rest energy in that frame, and any additional energy acquired by the object above that rest energy will increase an object's mass. For example, with a sensitive enough scale, one could measure an increase in mass after heating an object.

In the International System of Units (SI), the unit of energy is the joule, named after James Prescott Joule. It is a derived unit. It is equal to the energy expended (or work done) in applying a force of one newton through a distance of one metre. However energy is also expressed in many other units not part of the SI, such as ergs, calories, British Thermal units, kilowatt-hours and kilocalories, which require a conversion factor when expressed in SI units.

The SI unit of energy rate (energy per unit time) is the watt, which is a joule per second. Thus, one joule is one watt-second, and 3600 joules equal one watt-hour. The CGS energy unit is the erg and the imperial and US customary unit is the foot-pound. Other energy units such as the electronvolt, food calories or thermodynamic kcal (based on the temperature change of water in a heating process), and BTU are used in specific areas of science and commerce.

This article uses material from the Wikipedia article "Energy", which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.